BREAKING BEAUTY

SEED BEAUTY TO ENTER SKINCARE ARENA

Sunday, August 19th, 2018

Seed Beauty, the parent company of ColourPop, Kylie Cosmetics, and KKW Beauty, is launching its first skincare brand, Fourth Ray.  The five-piece collection will employ natural ingredients such as ginseng, willow bark, papaya enzymes and botanicals.  Initial offerings will include the BFD Cleaning Oil, AM to the PM Gel Cleanser, Keep Clear Clarifying Tonic, The Lightweight Hydrator, and Later Hater Spot Treatment, with items retailing between $10-14.  Fourth Ray will take a wellness-based approach to beauty and feature several accessories (highlights will be a rose quartz roller and a  set of silk scrunchies).  Three product bundles will be sold between  $22-$150.

Speaking with WWD, co-founder, Laura Nelson, shared, “I was trying to find really clean products that are 100 percent cruelty-free and vegan.  This was layered with so many customers asking ColourPop [on social media] what kind of skin-care we were using. It was incongruous [with our brand] to say we were using a $150 moisturizer or $200 serum. We knew we had an opportunity to have amazing, effective products at really accessible price points.”

Fourth Ray launches on-line August 23rd.

SCENTBIRD’S NEW MAKEUP PILOT PROGRAM

Sunday, August 19th, 2018

courtesy image

Scentbird, the subscription-based fragrance company, is launching an exclusive, Makeup Pilot Program. The beta program will feature a range of curated, full-sized color cosmetics from best-selling beauty brands as part of Scentbird’s existing monthly subscription service.Initially launched in 2013 as a perfume subscription service, Scentbird now includes a collection of over 500 fragrances (including perfume, cologne, unisex) in addition to its own namesake line of scented bath, body, and home goods.

“With new beauty products emerging every day, it’s important for brands to develop a genuine connection with the consumer,” explains Scentbird CEO and Co-Founder, Mariya Nurislamova.  “We are able to provide a platform that allows consumers to start that conversation, by choosing what they want to sample each month and in return, share their feedback and experiential insights directly with the brand.”

The first products set to be tested in the launch of the Makeup Pilot Program’ will include a range of 50 color-cosmetics featuring, tarte tarteist quick drymatte lip paint, Kat Von D Tattoo Liner, Ardency Inn Modster Long Play Supercharged Lip Color, trèStiQue Sharpen & Smudge Eye Pencil, and Deck of Scarlet Limited Edition Palettes.  Each item is available as a limited-time offer in order to focus on the true elements of product discovery by way of sampling.

VOGUE UNDERSCORES MINIMUM MODELING AGE

Thursday, August 16th, 2018

In a call to action, Vogue has issued an addendum to its 2018 Global Vendor Code of Conduct, a response to numerous accounts of sexual harassment in the fashion industry.  In doing so, Condé Nast established provisions for safe working spaces.  Additionally, it addressed the age of models. “In recognition of the unique vulnerability of minors thrown into a career where they have little control and where abuse has been all too commonplace, the vendor code of conduct stipulates that no model under the age of eighteen will be photographed for editorial (unless he or she is the subject of an article, in which case the model will be both chaperoned and styled in an age-appropriate manner).”

In a new article, “Why the Fashion World Needs to Commit to an 18+ Modeling Standard, Vogue acknowledged that it partially created the environment of “making it routine for children—since that’s what they are—to be dressed and marketed as glamorous adults.,” citing Brooke Shields’ cover at the age of fourteen (above).  However, the publication states that it will no longer participate.  “No more: It’s not right for us, it’s not right for our readers, and it’s not right for the young models competing to appear in these pages. While we can’t rewrite the past, we can commit to a better future.”

The problem has been endemic in the fashion houses.  “It’s a numbers game,” says Chris Gay, co-CEO of Elite World Group, in the article. “Brands want 40, 50 girls in a show, leaving less opportunity for designers to spend time with each talent. There’s no time for long fittings. But you know who fits those tiny samples? … Teenagers—girls who haven’t finished growing yet.”